Wednesday, September 10, 2014

RLRA for Small Group Tutoring

When Denise and I began creating our conversational activities, we were using them in the classroom with our elementary and middle school language students.  Since then, we have both had opportunities to use our curriculum in the context of individual and small group tutoring, and the activities are very much adaptable to this context.

I (Elizabeth) am currently taking a year off teaching to be home with my baby, but I am continuing to teach what I call my "library class" -- the small French class I teach at the library.  I have four students-- a 2nd grader, two 3rd graders, and a 4th grader.  Last year, we completed the first half of Real French tout de suite Level I, and the students made nice progress.  We meet once a week for 45 minutes.

This year, I have renewed energy toward the class--I have to admit that I am really missing the classroom maybe that is why I spent 4 hours prepping my first "library class" last week.  I decided that I would use it as an outlet to create and test some new lessons.

The students always enjoy any conversation that lends itself easily to role play.  Last year, they really enjoyed creating their own menus and acting out the restaurant conversation from Unit 6 in the book.  So, with that in mind I wrote a lesson about ordering in a French bakery.  Who doesn't like to learn and talk about French pastries? :)

I am going to post the conversation here, but for any of you who would like the full lesson (which includes 5 pages of oral and written activities, a speaking rubric, and a quiz), it is available on TeachersPayTeachers for a very reasonable price. :) 

As you can see, it is a simple, useful, and fun conversation (three adjectives that describe our curriculum well!).  The students had a ball acting it out.  One thing that I have really liked using with the small group class is the mixer/vocabulary cards.  I print out a set of them, and they enjoy manipulating the cards.  In this instance, they are ordering and serving pastries as they hand the cards to each other.  I also printed out some fake euros so they could practice numbers in the context of counting money.

I love how the lesson is a great starting point for discussion of French culture.  Next week I plan to show them photographs of the pastries (easy to find with a simple google search!) and see if I can find a fun song on youtube to go along with the conversation.  Oh wait, I just found one :



I came back from my class so inspired today that I just had to share.  I hope that those of you using our resources are having similar experiences-- we always love hearing your success stories!